b'60 PRIMARY SOURCES IN AMERICAN HISTORY: THEMES HistoryDefining Documents in American History: NEW! Spring 2022 DEFINING DOCUMENTS Domestic TerrorismIN AMERICAN HISTORYWhile there are many definitions of domestic terrorism, it is largely characterized as terrorism in which Domesticthe perpetrator targets his/her own country. Also called homegrown terrorism, domestic terrorism is Terrorism defined by the U.S. State Department as premeditated, politically motivated violence perpetrated against noncombatant targets by subnational groups or clandestine agents, usually intended to influence an audience. The two largest categories of domestic terrorism (DT) or domestic violent extremism (DVE) are: racially or ethnically motivated violent extremism; and anti-government or anti-authority extremism. These volumes provide thoughtful analysis of the following documents: Unabomber Manifesto, Washington Post, 1995; Oklahoma Bombing Memorial Prayer Service Address, by Bill Clinton, April 23, 1995, report from the FBI National Counterterrorism Center,Did you know there was a terror attack on New York City in 1920?, reports of notable terrorist attacks, such as the Harpers Ferry Massacre (1859), Tulsa Race Massacre (1921), Centennial OlympicFREEPark bombing (1996), Boston Marathon bombing (2013), Charleston church shooting (2015), Orlando Online Access NEW!nightclub shooting (2016), Charlottesville car attack (2017), and the storming of the U.S. Capitol FREE (2021). Each in-depth chapter provides a thorough commentary and analysis of each primary source document, often reprinted in its entirety. Commentary includes a Summary, Overview, Defining Moment, Author Biography, Detailed Document Analysis, and discussion of Essential Themes.March 2022 | Two Volumes; 400 Pages | Print ISBN: 978-1-63700-087-8 | Library Price: $295Defining Documents in American History: NEW! American CitizenshipHISTORYThis two-volume set examines how todays U.S. citizen was first imagined, how citizenship was established and codified, and how it has been refined over time. Essays also consider barriers to full citizenship, including slavery, voting rights, womens rights, civil rights, prisoners rights, immigration quotas, and the process of becoming a naturalized citizen. The thoughtful and insightful document analysis provided in these pages will help readers gain an in-depth understanding of American citizenship. The documents analyzed in this set include: the Declaration of Independence, the United States Constitution; the Bill of Rights; the Compromise of 1850; the Fifteenth, Nineteenth, Twenty-fourth, and Twenty-fifth Amendments; PRIMARY SOURCES IN AMERICAN HISTORY: THEMESand the Voting Rights Act of 1975. Each in-depth chapter provides a thorough commentary and analysis of each primary source document, often reprinted in its entirety. Commentary includes a Summary, Overview, Defining Moment, Author Biography, Detailed Document Analysis, and discussion of Essential Themes. Many of these chapters are bolstered through the inclusion of Supplemental Historical Documents, whichFREEbroaden the scope of the book and offer additional context.Online Access NEW!May 2021 | Two Volumes; 400 Pages | Print ISBN: 978-1-64265-760-9 | Library Price: $295FREEDefining Documents in American History: NEW! Fall 2021 The First AmendmentThese volumes explore the five freedoms protected in the First Amendmentspeech, religion, press, assembly, and the right to petition the government. Together, these five guaranteed freedoms make the people of the United States the freest in the world. There is no age or citizenship requirement to exercise your First Amendment rightsthey are guaranteed the day you are born as long as you are in the U.S. Few Americans would question the importance of the First Amendment, despite the misunderstanding that often swirls around the principles embodied in these freedoms. From the birth of the First Amendment to today, most Americans exercise these rights every day. Documents examined throughout the text include James Madisons Draft of First Amendment Rights (1789), Barron v. Baltimore (1833) regarding the right to petition the government, Franklin D. Roosevelts Four Freedoms Speech (1941), Everson v. Board of Education (1947) regarding the establishment of religion and Hurley v. Irish-American LGB Group (1995) regarding the freedom to associate. EachFREEin-depth chapter provides a thorough commentary and analysis of each primary source document, often reprinted in its entirety. Commentary includes a Summary, Overview, Defining Moment, Author Online Access NEW!Biography, Detailed Document Analysis, and discussion of Essential Themes. Many of these chapters FREEare bolstered through the inclusion of Supplemental Historical Documents, which broaden the scope of the book and offer additional context.October 2021 | Two Volumes; 400 Pages | Print ISBN: 978-1-63700-052-6 | Library Price: $295GET ONLINE ACCESS(800) 221-1592 WITH YOUR PRINT BUY! www.salempress.com'